Juvenile humpback carcass washes up on sand spit at Harrington

Sand spit at Harrington: The carcass of a juvenile humpback whale washed up this week. Photo by Stephen Underwood
Sand spit at Harrington: The carcass of a juvenile humpback whale washed up this week. Photo by Stephen Underwood

A carcass of a juvenile humpback whale has washed up on a sand spit at Harrington.

Harrington resident Stephen Underwood discovered the carcass while walking on the spit of sand on the sea wise of Harrington wall on Thursday afternoon, October 11. He went home and returned with his camera to photograph the carcass in detail.

He returned to the beach on Friday morning to find the carcass still in place. He took more photographs and then notified MidCoast Council. Council notified the National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Stephen said a very large whale, believed to be a humpback, was slapping its fins and tail, presumably to ward off sharks, in Crowdy Bay earlier in the week. Killer whales, known as orcas, also follow the humpback whale migration along the east coast but are not common.

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