Cunjevoi breaks off rocks and washes up on Manning Great Lakes beaches

A large amount of cunjevoi has been dumped at Shelly Beach, south of Elizabeth Beach at Pacific Palms.
A large amount of cunjevoi has been dumped at Shelly Beach, south of Elizabeth Beach at Pacific Palms.

Recent rough seas are responsible for the presence of cunjevoi on some of our beaches.

Heavy swell and big waves break up the cunjevoi on the rocks and wash it off onto the beach.

Monstrous ocean swells that occurred mid-January were the biggest Roger Edwards has seen in the more than 30 years he has been fishing at Crowdy Head.

“Off Crowdy I have never seen it as big and waves actually breaking on shallow ground so far out to sea,” said Roger, a resident at Crowdy and operator of Crowdy Bay Charters.

“There are reefs we drive over that are eight to 10 metres deep and the water is actually breaking over those.”

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Readings from the Manly Hydraulics Laboratory, which is funded by the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, show that swells started to pick up at Crowdy from about sunrise on Sunday, January 14, with waves peaking at lunchtime on Tuesday, January 16, at a maximum height of 11.27metres.

A buoy located five nautical miles north east of Crowdy Head measures the readings.

The huge ocean swells that occurred the week starting January 15 also resulted in an unprecedented amount of kelp washing up on Manning Point beach.

Brian Shoesmith, who has lived at Manning Point for the whole of his 75 years, said he has never seen so much of the seaweed collect like this in his lifetime.