The road is no place for excuses: Road crashes are often the result of poor behaviour

CHOICES: Speeding, drink driving and fatigue are contributing factors in the majority of deaths on NSW roads and are more likely to contribute to road trauma in country areas.
CHOICES: Speeding, drink driving and fatigue are contributing factors in the majority of deaths on NSW roads and are more likely to contribute to road trauma in country areas.

This article is sponsored by the NSW Government

Road crashes are never accidents. They are often the result of the poor choices people make. 

Those choices are conscious decisions such as driving after having a drink, driving too fast or driving while tired.

Speeding, drink driving and fatigue are contributing factors in the majority of deaths on NSW roads and are more likely to contribute to road trauma in country areas. 

While people in country NSW make up one-third of the state’s population, two-thirds of its fatalities occur on country roads. 

Sadly, most fatal crashes on country roads involve local residents, and many crash close to home. 

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Mid North Coast Rural Fire Service superintendent Sean McCardle said these are avoidable deaths that wouldn’t happen if people made different choices on the road.

“That is why I’m getting behind this new campaign to save lives on country roads – by helping to make people aware it’s the choices they make that are costing lives,” Mr McCardle said. 

The campaign focuses on the ways that many Aussie drivers justify their poor decisions on the road. 

Mr McCardle sees the impact of drivers’ choices all the time, and said it is very difficult for his Rural Fire Service members because they are volunteers in country communities and as a result they often know the crash victims.

Mr McCardle implores drivers to heed the message to avoid tragedy on our roads.

“It’s a choice people make to speed, to drink drive … road tragedy is never an accident,” Mr McCardle said.

Supt Sean McCardle

Supt Sean McCardle

“Yeah … but I was only going a few kilometres over the speed limit.”

“Yeah … I’d had a few but I needed to get the kids home.” 

It’s everyday excuses like these that help drivers justify taking risks but what drivers may not be aware of is the the lifelong trauma and knock-on effect that car crashes cause. 

Mr McCardle has seen the consequences of road trauma and knows that the impact of suffering not only affects the driver’s life but also their family and friends for the rest of their lives.

This article is sponsored by the NSW Government