Awarding Rachel

Rachel Blanch during the GP Synergy’s Seasonal Celebration and Awards Night in Newcastle. Photo supplied

Rachel Blanch during the GP Synergy’s Seasonal Celebration and Awards Night in Newcastle. Photo supplied

The role of general practice staff in training the next generation of general practitioners (GP) was recognised at GP Synergy’s seasonal celebration and awards night in Newcastle recently.

Rachel Blanch from Gloucester MediCo was recognised as Practice Manager of the Year for the Hunter, Manning and Central Coast training subregion at the event.

Raised on a beef cattle property in the Barrington Tops, Ms Blanch is passionate about providing registrars with a comprehensive training experience.

“I enjoy meeting the new registrars and introducing them to rural general practice.

“My wish is that they will fall in love with the work and the community and want to stay, to ensure that there are always good medical services locally,” she said.

Ms Blanch began working with Gloucester MediCo in 1998 and has been practice manager for the last six years.

“We have a great team and live in a beautiful part of the world, so I always hope that the next new registrar will be the one to relocate and make our town their home for the long term,” she said.

GP Synergy chief executive officer, John Oldfield said there are currently more than 180 general practices across the Hunter, Manning and Central Coast region accredited to train registrars.

“The role of practice managers, in practices maintaining their training accreditation and in supporting the training of GP registrars, is immensely important.

“In addition to helping registrars navigate the behind-the-scenes workings of general practice, it is often practice managers that help registrars and their families settle into new towns for their training.

“If registrars realise what a great part of the world Hunter, Manning and Central Coast is to live and practise in during their training they are more likely to stay here once they complete their GP training,” Mr Oldfield said.