Support to help community land projects

Students at Grossman High School learning about rehabilitation planting. Photo coursety of HLLS
Students at Grossman High School learning about rehabilitation planting. Photo coursety of HLLS

Hunter Local Land Services (HLLS) has $30,000 to share between community organisations across the region, including Taree, to support events and projects that help raise awareness of high biodiversity and cultural heritage values and participation in natural resources management.

Specifically, the funding is available to help with the promotion and delivery of events or projects involving natural resource management, Aboriginal traditional land management practices, sustainable agriculture, biosecurity (plant and animal diseases, pests and weeds) and emergency management.

The program is now open to community groups, schools, Landcare groups, Local Aboriginal Land Councils, committees, not for profit organisations or industry and producer groups.

Each group can apply for up to $1500 to help increase community engagement and participation in their event, or to deliver small-scale on ground activities.

“Our small grants program enables grass-roots groups to get the wider community thinking about how they look after our environment and what practices they can change to help make a difference in our region,” HLLS board chair, Lindy Hyam said.

“We can assist with awareness raising events, school programs, workshops, resources and products or small on-ground works, to help these groups deliver important messages about sustainability.

Some recent successful projects include:

• Gresford District Landcare hosting an Indigenous fire management workshop to demonstrate how utilising traditional methods can increase habitat for both flora and fauna

• Maitland City Council highlighting the impact of litter and stormwater pollution on the Woodberry Wetlands through a school art competition and developing education kits

• Grossman High School embedding sustainability in school culture by rehabilitating significant natural bushland with a planting program and hosting a presentation from Environmentalist Tim Silverwood.

The program is made possible thanks to funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare program, Catchment Action NSW and the Hunter Catchment Contributions levy.

Applications are now open and more information is available through our website http://hunter.lls.nsw.gov.auor by contacting one of our offices.

Projects must be completed by August 31 2018.