A new guide for macadamia growers offers improved farming methods

NEW GUIDE: Jeremy Bright, NSW DPI, Stephanie Alt, Give Soil a Chance, Bob Howard, Geological Exploration Services, and Kel Langfield, North Coast Local Land Services.

NEW GUIDE: Jeremy Bright, NSW DPI, Stephanie Alt, Give Soil a Chance, Bob Howard, Geological Exploration Services, and Kel Langfield, North Coast Local Land Services.

A NEW guide for macadamia growers has been developed by North Coast Local Land Services, the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) this month.

The latest Integrated Orchard Management guide was launched to over 100 attendees at the 2017 Macadamia Consultant’s Forum in Brisbane recently and offers strategies to improve erosion management and develop successful drainage systems.

The development of the guide, Macadamia Integrated Orchard Management Drainage 2017, was led by NSW DPI in conjunction with Give Soil a Chance, Geological Exploration Services, and North Coast Local Land Services.

Land Services Officer Kel Langfield said that the guide offers macadamia growers and managers the latest information on good drainage management.

“It promotes the adoption of best practices that support orchard productivity and improve catchment conditions,” she said.

Erosion and drainage management is being transformed through new uses of Light Detection and Ranging information which uses laser to map a three-dimensional view of a property. Digital models for elevation and predicted soil loss can identify orchard zones that need different management.

North Coast Local Land Services has been helping local macadamia growers manage erosion over the last eighteen months and the Integrated Orchard Management Drainage 2017 Guide is an outcome of some of the previous work.

“We have provided small grants to macadamia growers to implement priority erosion control works in twelve existing orchards,” Kel said.

“We also engaged Bob Howard from Geological Exploration Services to help 36 growers to develop Erosion Management Action Plans utilising LIDAR data and modelling, working across 944 ha of macadamia orchards.

“Using LiDAR and digital modelling for planning is a key step to improving the viability and sustainability of macadamia orchards on the North Coast.

“These projects were very successful as they combine technology, industry and grower knowledge to produce outcomes that improve farm resilience to extreme weather events, and improve environmental management within the orchard.” Kel concluded.

Macadamia growers who would like more information are being encouraged to contact North Coast Local Land Services on 1300 795 299 or 6623 3900 or find them on Facebook.

The story Leading the way in macadamia farming first appeared on Hunter Valley News.

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