Learn about palliative care at Manning Valley Push 4 Palliative meet and greet

Linda Walters (MVP4P), clinical nurse specialist Sally Drury, nurse unit manager Donna Nicholson and Shirley Perrin (MVP4P) with the new machine.
Linda Walters (MVP4P), clinical nurse specialist Sally Drury, nurse unit manager Donna Nicholson and Shirley Perrin (MVP4P) with the new machine.

MANNING Valley Push 4 Palliative (MVP4P) has donated a portable oxygen concentrator to Manning Hospital. 

The machine, which is worth close to $5000, allows palliative care patients up to one hour of oxygen outside of the hospital.

Palliative care clinical nurse specialist Sally Drury said the machine will allow patients to attend appointments or to go down the street with their family for a coffee. 

“It’s modern, discreet and easy to manage,” Sally said. 

“It will allow patients more accessibility and independence.”

Previously the hospital did not have a portable or rechargable oxygen concentrator. 

MVP4P work with the community health team at Manning Hospital to find out what equipment they can provide to fill in gaps and add to the comfort of palliative care patients.

Sally identified the need for the machine when a man from Queensland traveled to Taree to attend a funeral and became acutely ill.

“He wasn’t able to leave the hospital to go to the funeral. It was so frustrating,” Sally said. 

“This machine will make our patients lives a lot easier."

The new machine will be on show at MVP4P’s informal meet and greet at Taree Library this Saturday, May 20 from 10am. 

The meet and greet will mark the launch of a week-long display in the library to mark National Palliative Care Week, which runs from May 21 to May 28. 

There will be morning tea, a raffle draw and opportunities to learn more about MVP4P and palliative care services in the Manning region. Raffle tickets are on sale tomorrow at Taree Central. 

MVP4P chairperson Judy Hollingworth will also share her experience in attending the State Government’s Palliative Care Roundtable in Kempsey on Monday, May 15. 

Judy said the State-wide consultation is essential in finding out what’s working, what’s not working and also what is missing in regional palliative care services.

“They will collect the input to formulate new palliative care policy,” Judy said.