Calls for lowered speed limit on Lakes Way stretch

POLICE investigations are continuing into the cause of the fatal crash along the Lakes Way, near Rainbow Flat, on April 4.

The notorious stretch of road has been criticised extensively by members of the public commuting between Taree and Forster, many who say it was a ticking time bomb.

The speed limit along the Lakes Way in this section is 90kph with calls for it be lowered getting louder by the day.

And in the two weeks since the tragedy that saw a young woman's life cut short, there have been another two minor accidents in exactly the same spot.

On Tuesday evening there were two accidents within two hours of each other, one that resulted in a car slamming into a tree, the second that saw a car go through the same fence as the fatal accident, flipping the car. Thankfully the drivers walked away unscathed in both instances.

This part of the Lakes Way is owned and managed by Greater Taree City Council and the public is urging council to apply to the Roads and Maritime Services to have the speed limit lowered, as well as for the road to be restored before another accident happens.

Inspector Christine George from Manning Great Lakes Local Area Command urged motorists to drive to the conditions.

"We know it's a bad road and we know that you should slow down along that stretch, particularly when it's raining," she said.

"I know myself that I drive about 30kph under the speed limit because of the conditions and drivers need to be aware of this too."

When the Times contacted Greater Taree City Council for a response to the accident, council did not respond.

The Roads and Maritime Services did report that it had not been in contact with council about the stretch, and had this to say:

"Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) has not received a formal request from Taree or Great Lakes councils on the speed limit of the Lakes Way at Rainbow Flat.

"NSW Police attended the scene of the recent tragic crash on the Lakes Way and are investigating the cause of the crash.

"RMS will liaise with local council and NSW Police to determine whether a speed review is necessary.

"Speed reviews take into consideration crash data, pedestrian activity, road environment and traffic characteristics such as volumes. The speed limit at the crash location is 90 kph," an RMS spokesperson said.

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